Useful links

Contests we enter:

Mathcounts is the premier math contest for middle schoolers

Mathleague.org sponsors Saturday tournaments that we attend a few times per year (in Austin).

Mathleague.com has contests for both middle and high schoolers that are done during meetings

Mathematical Olympiad for Elementary and Middle Schools (we only enter this sporadically)

American Mathematics Competitions. An annual contest for middle schoolers, plus a series of contests for high schoolers culminating in the selection of the US team to the International Mathematics Olympiad.

Private School Interscholastic Association. This is similar to UIL, but for private and homeschools. Events are only for gr. K-8

Rice University hosts a high school contest in Houston every Feb. Advanced middle schoolers can go.

TAMU host a high school contest in College Station in Nov. Advanced middle schoolers can go.

Texas State Mathworks offers a preliminary test for gr 7 and below, leading to selection of the Texas team to the Primary World Mathematics competition in Hong Kong. Also used for invitations to a math camp in San Marcos. Sample "Hong Kong Test" below, under attachments, or complete archive here.

Useful Sites:

www.artofproblemsolving.com Central source of all info related to mathematics competitions for elementary grades through college. In additional to info on the site, they offer excellent books geared towards competitions, on-line courses, and discussion forums. Check out Alcumus, which is a free interactive course in probability and combinatorics appropriate for Mathcounts level and above. Also FTW! (For The Win) patterned on Mathcounts Countdown round. Direct links to Alcumus and FTW! below.

http://www.livingmath.net a discussion of math learning based on games, literature, other non-traditional materials

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/ Sort of an online math encyclopedia.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBhknPMOYbk Five minute news clip showing what a Mathcounts-style tournament looks like. Shot at the Georgetown tournament a number of years ago.

http://www.tip.duke.edu/ Duke's talent search. Participating kids take the SAT in 7th grade. SAT math and Mathcounts are very similar, so math team kids usually do very well on the math part.

http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm MIT courses online. Video lectures.

Saylor.org is a free and open collection of college level courses online or thru iTunes

http://www.mymathcounts.com math counts resources. Some free, some paid.

http://www.numberphile.com/pi/pi_sounds.html free math videos.

Science Teams

- AAH Science Teams

Contact: Minda Weldon (mindaweldon at gmail dot com)

Website: http://aahscienceteams.weebly.com/

- Austin Homeschool Science League (AHSL)

Contact: Shannon Rizzo (shannonsclan at gmail dot com)

Website: http://ahscl.weebly.com/

- North Austin Science Alliance (NASA)

Contact: Jenn Allen <nasatexas@outlook.com>

Website: http://northaustinsciencealliance.weebly.com/

- Hill Country Science Team

Contact: Tatiana Gilliam <hillcountryscienceteam@gmail.com>

Website: http://hillcountryscienceteam.weebly.com/

Math and Science Classes and Lessons (Online and physical):

http://reachhmschool.com/index.html Two locations. Courses use standard texts common to college prep programs in public and secular private schools. Not specifically problem solving, but math classes are taught by Jo Lindberg, who has coached both middle and high school math teams.

http://academics1st.net Math plus other subjects. some use of AOPS. South and central locations.

http://onedayacademy.com Multiple locations. Courses use Saxon for math and Christian based science texts (Bob Jones, Apologia).

www.artofproblemsolving.com Interactive online courses. Some free, some not. Excellent place to learn problem solving as preparation for competition, or as an end in itself.

Saturday Morning Math Group (SMMG) at UT - once a month presentation of a topic meant to be of interest to high schoolers and advanced middle scoolers. includes an activity and a snack. Different presenters and topics each time. http://www.ma.utexas.edu/users/smmg/

Computer programming for kids and adults: http://www.code.org/

Free Online Educational Videos

http://www.refseek.com/directory/educational_videos.html This is a list of 25 websites with free educational videos. I’ve made comments below on some of the ones I looked at

http://www.academicearth.org/ This one is college courses on video. Includes profs from Harvard, MIT, etc. Similar to Teaching Company videos. One of Time Magazines “Best Websites” in 2009

http://www.watchknow.org/ Thousands of individual lessons geared towards K-12. Online, or free iPhone/iPad app.

www.khanacademy.org Free online video lessons in all subjects. 2000+ lessons. Math topics include arithmetic through calculus. They also have chemistry, biology, some finance. The 2-3 of these I looked at looked really good. They won an educational grant from the Bill Gates foundation.

http://glad2teach.co.uk/ Math tricks. Good for Number Sense and Human Calculator type tricks

http://ed.ted.com 5-10 min animated explanations of various topics, including many math topics.

Social Skills:

It is fairly common for kids with unusual math talent to also struggle with social situations. Some kids

considering math team might benefit from directed and professional attention to social skills. A couple

of team families have used the services of < http://spectrumsocial.net/> and recommend them. (I have no personal experience or commercial interest).

Practice problems:

http://mathcounts.saab.org/mc.cgi Mathcounts drills

http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Edutainment/ftwcs3/Pages/tos.php FTW! Patterned after Mathcounts Countdown round

http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Alcumus/Introduction.php Very useful for Mathcounts and above. Especially good for probability and combinatorics.

http://mathcounts.org/Page.aspx?pid=1573 Mathcounts Problem of the Week

Math Fun

www.vihart.com

http://www.edgalaxy.com/journal/2012/7/20/free-e-book-acing-math-one-deck-at-a-time.html Fun ideas, including free e-book with 100 card games to teach math.

Other Contests and groups:

AOPS List Find a comprehensive list of all kinds of academic competitions at http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Wiki/index.php/Academic_competitions

USA Computing Olympiad http://web.me.com/dpiele/usaco/USACO.html The problems are very mathematical, and successful participants are generally successful at math contests too.The on-line training materials are superb, but students need to get the basics of programming in C++ or Java before they can be used.

USACO getting started info https://www.dropbox.com/s/s9a6vz2y6tn5vf7/USACO%20Info.pdf?dl=0

USA Mathematical Talent Search http://www.usamts.org/ Students do this individually over the internet. It is basically about training to students to write up mathematical proofs. Appropropriate for high schoolers and advanced middle schoolers.

Interesting Articles:

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/03/the-math-revolution/426855/ This talks about a revolution in math education in the US, based on problem solving.

http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Resources/articles.php This has links to several articles. Pros and Cons of competitions, tips from experienced coaches, etc.

http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Resources/articles.php?page=calculustrap "The Calculus Trap". Read this if your child is highly gifted in math and you are considering rapid acceleration through a traditional curriculum.

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2009/math-gender.html Interesting article about research by an MIT economist using AMC data to study gender differences in mathematics. He basically argues that a small handful of high schools do a consistantly better job than the rest at developing girls with mathematical ability.

http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Resources/articles.php?page=mistakes Concrete suggestions to avoid careless mistakes

http://philip.greenspun.com/careers/women-in-science reasons why women (or anyone else) might korationally choose not to enter careers in math or science

http://www.npr.org/programs/atc/features/2001/feb/010226.cfoa.html NPR story about homeschooling that featured my son as a middle schooler

Our Math Story (under attachments) - tells the story of my son's homeschooling math journey and how AAH Math Team came into being

Lockhart's Lament (under attachments) - A mathematician talks about the moronic way that math is typically taught in schools, drawing analogies from music and other fields. Interesting, but long.

Tips and Tricks (under attachments) - General advice, formulas, and practice problems from George Acuff, a very successful Mathcounts coach from St. Marks in Dallas.